Free Patterns and Tutorials

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How To Pick Up Stitches for the Raglan Sleeve and Avoid Holes in the Underarm

how-to-pick-up-stitches-for-raglan-sleeve-without-holes-1-10-16-14

Happy Sunday, dear friends! Today I decided to show you my little trick that I use to avoid holes in the underarm when picking up stitches for the raglan sleeve. When I knit my first raglan, I religiously followed the pattern instructions, which said to pick up cast on stitches in the underarm and at the end to sew small holes. I did sew the holes, but every once in awhile the sewed in holes become holes again. I struggled a lot with them and thought there had to be a way to avoid these holes altogether and not bother closing them up after you are done knitting. After experimenting I came up with the solution that I now use every single time when knitting the raglan. It never failed me once! I hope you will find it helpful as well and will get rid of these pesky underarm holes once and for all.

At first let’s see what happens when you pick up stitches the “traditional” way. Usually when you divide the body and sleeves, you are instructed to cast on x number of stitches between the front and the back. For example, the instructions would look something like this:

Body and Sleeves Separating: Work front xxx sts to marker, remove marker, place xxx sleeve sts on waste yarn, cast on 6 sts, work back xxx sts to marker, remove marker, place xxx sleeve sts on waste yarn, cast on 6 sts, work front xxx sts.

When you are done with the body, you usually get back to the sleeves. This is how it looks like, more or less. You can see the little “knobs” on each of 6 cast on stitch.

How To Pick Up Stitches For Raglan Sleeve Without Holes

This what usually happens next, if you follow the instructions.

If you need to see a bigger photo, open it in the new tab.

Now let’s see how we can avoid it altogether. I am going to use the yarn in the contrasting color for demonstration purposes.

If you need to see a bigger photo, open it in the new tab.

We can’t just continue working in the round as usual, because we have 8 extra sts on the needles and it will drastically change the size of the sleeve. So, we need one more step before we can continue our sleeve as usual.

After you picked up all the stitches needed, continue knitting the first round:

How To Pick Up Stitches For Raglan Sleeve Without Holes

In order to come back to the instructed 6 underarm stitches, we need to decrease all the extra sts on the next round.

If you need to see a bigger photo, open it in the new tab.

Now let’s knit a couple of rounds and take a look at the underarm:

How To Pick Up Stitches For Raglan Sleeve Without Holes

Ta-daaam! No holes! And the number of sts is exactly the same as indicated in the pattern instructions! You can use this little trick with any raglan sleeve instructions. Important to remember: there is no certain rule how many extra sts need to be picked up. The number of picked up extra sts can vary – sometimes you need 4, sometimes 5, sometimes just 2 is enough. You will have to watch your fabric and see if all the holes/gaps are closed. And always decrease all the extra sts to come to the number of sleeve sts indicated in the pattern.

If you have any questions, feel free to ask them in the comments!


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By | 2017-08-01T07:58:49+00:00 October 2nd, 2016|Free Patterns and Tutorials, Knitting, Tutorial|31 Comments

Grateful Shawl. Asymmetric Triangular Shawl Free Pattern.

Grateful Shawl

Free Asymmetric Shawl Pattern

My Granny is 70 years old today and I am celebrating here, too far away from her with the free pattern for you! A very simple, but special for me project – Grateful Shawl, made for my Granny back in Russia. I didn’t knit much during my trip, as I felt like I wanted to be 100% with my family and friends, but this simple garter stitch shawl was the perfect companion for long car/train rides, quiet evenings with my family and sleep overs with my girlfriends. I didn’t even notice how I finished it! It stayed with my Granny back in Russia and will remind her of the time we spent together. She recently had a surgery and now is recovering successfully, thus the name of the shawl – Grateful. I am grateful that everything went pretty smoothly, I am grateful for the time we spent together and I am infinitely grateful for her love. She is my true angel.

Project Details

Pattern

The shawl is of classic asymmetric triangular shape. I wrote a quick pattern for it, you are welcome to use it!

Free Asymmetric Shawl Pattern

Yarn

Hawthorne Fingering by Knit PicksI am not really into variegated yarn, being more drawn to solid colors, but once in awhile I crave for fun shades and these skeins were perfect for it! The colors are really nice and two shades complimented each other beautifully; the yarn is light and springy. Having said that, I must admit that I doubt that I will ever knit with this yarn again. Don’t get me wrong – each skein was perfect, but the yarn felt too synthetic to me, maybe it’s 20% of polyamide in the content or the feeling of the superwash wool itself, or maybe I am just too spoiled with all the gorgeous natural fibers I got to work with during the last months, but I didn’t enjoy it running through my fingers. Other than that, it was fun to work with.

Design Details

Shape

Asymmetric triangular shawl. I find this shape one of the most versatile ones and it works great with simple stitches and variegated yarns! Also it is very easy to remember the pattern and knit with “closed” eyes.

Texture

This yarn has a great stitch definition and is perfect for garter – the stitches are perfectly even and pop out.

Free Asymmetric Shawl Pattern


 Asymmetric Shawl Free Pattern

The shawl is knit sideways from the corner with the attached 3-stitch I-cord edge that is knit simultaneously with the main fabric to a create smooth and neat edge and avoid finishing later.

Free Asymmetric Shawl Pattern

MATERIALS

Yarn. 2 skeins of Hawthorne Fingering by Knit PicksThe estimated yardage is approximately 700 yds.

Note: What is great about this shawl is that you can use any yarn from your stash. You can also use less or more yarn for your project. I was basically knitting until both skeins were finished, leaving just enough yarn to bind off. I was alternating the skeins every two rows. You are free to knit in solid color or set up your own stripe sequence – stripes/color blocks, the opportunities are really endless!

Needles. 2.5 mm (US 1).

Note: Again the needle size is very flexible. Just go with the one that is the best fit for your yarn and the fabric you want to create.

GAUGE

20 stitches and 48 rows = 4 inches [10 cm] in garter stitch.

Note: The exact gauge is not essential in this project, the most important thing is that you like the fabric in your swatch. 

SIZE

Note: The shawl is knit from the corner, so you are in full control of its size and can easily adjust it and stop whenever you feel like it.

ABBREVIATIONS/STITCHES

  • k – knit
  • k2tog – knit two together
  • LH – left hand
  • p – purl
  • RH – right hand
  • RS – right side
  • sl – slip
  • ssk – slip, slip, knit
  • st (sts) – stitch (stitches)
  • WS – wrong side
  • wyib – with yarn in back
  • wyif – with yarn in front
  • yo – yarn over

INSTRUCTIONS 

I am going to walk you through the beginning of the shawl. To see a bigger photo, open it in the new tab.

The shawl starts with the provisional cast on. There are several ways to do that, you can check this video – Provisional Cast-Ons – and choose your preferred method. I am using Crochet Provisional Cast-On here.

Now you have 9 starting stitches. First and last three sts will create the I-cord edging (see the arrows), the central 3 sts are the starting point of your shawl main body.

Free Asymmetric Shawl Pattern

Now the fun part starts!

Row 1 (RS): Sl 1 wyib, sl 1 wyif, k1; yo, knit to last 3 sts; k1, sl 1 wyif, p1.

Row 2 (WS): Sl 1 wyib, k1, sl 1 wyif; k2tog, k to last 3 sts, yo; sl 1 wyif, k1, p1.

Repeat Rows 1-2 until the desired depth of the shawl.

When the shawl reaches the desired size, start I-Cord Bind off.

You will get to the point when you have 3 I-cord sts on your RH needle and 3 sts left on your LH needle. Graft these stitches together to “close” the I-cord edging.

Free Asymmetric Shawl Pattern

Weave in all ends. Block the shawl.

Blocking is really essential in this project, don’t skip it! Your shawl will open up and bloom!

You are done!! Enjoy your shawl!

Free Asymmetric Shawl Pattern

Feel free to ask me any questions in the comments!!


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How To Knit a Tuck Stitch. Machine Knitting and Hand Knitting Tutorial.

Happy Monday!

How was your weekend? I hope you had a wonderful time and ready to start a new week!

As you know, I am working on a textured sweater – Sand – on my knitting machine. Today I would love to show you how the tuck stitch is formed on the machine and for those who don’t have a knitting machine, I prepared a tutorial for hand knit tuck stitch.

How To Knit a Tuck Stitch On a Knitting Machine

I am using Silver Reed LK150 machine; if you have a different machine some things might be different, but the principle stays the same.

Instructions

Before you start knitting a tuck stitch, knit a couple of rows in simple stockinette. Let’s start with the carriage on your RIGHT side.

Carriage settings. Side Levers – triangle. Russel levers – I.

  • Row 1: Starting from the THIRD needle, push every 4th needle into D position. Knit one row.
  • Row 2-3: Knit.
  • Row 4: The carriage is on your left. Change the settings: Side Levers – triangle. RIGHT Russel lever – II. Knit one row.
  • Row 5: Side Levers – triangle. Russel levers – I. Starting from the FIFTH needle, push every 4th needle into D position. Knit one row.
  • Row 6-7: Knit.
  • Row 8: The carriage is on your left. Change the settings: Side Levers – triangle. Russel levers – II. Knit one row.

Repeat Rows 1-8 for tuck stitch.

Tutorial

To see a bigger picture, open it in the new tab.

Rows 1-4

Then you will repeat the whole process again. You will change only one thing – you will push every 4th needle starting from the FIFTH needle – you  shift the tuck stitch two stitches to the left. Which means that the tuck stitches align in checkerboard order:

Tuck Stitch. Machine Knitting.

As you can see every 4th needle is holding a stitch that is “hugging” and pulling the loops up, forming a tuck stitch.

So what if you don’t have a machine, but you like this stitch and would love to try it in your hand knitting? There are many variations of a hand knit tuck stitch, I will show you the one that uses the same principles as the machine knit tuck stitch.

How To Knit a Tuck Stitch. Hand Knitting.

Instructions

Before you start knitting a tuck stitch, knit a couple of rows in simple stockinette. Stitch count: 4 st repeat + 5 balance sts.

  • Row 1 (RS): P2, *yo, sl 1 wyib as if to purl, p3; rep from * to last 3 sts; yo, sl 1 wyib as if to purl, p2.
  • Row 2 (WS): K2, *yo, sl yo + st wyib as if to purl, k3; rep from * to last 4 sts; yo, sl yo + st wyib as if to purl, k2.
  • Row 3: P2, *yo, sl 2 loops of yo + sl 1 wyib as if to purl, p3; rep from * to last 5 sts; yo, sl 2 loops of yo + sl 1 wyib as if to purl, p2.
  • Row 4: K2, *k4tog (3 yo loops + a st); rep from * to last 6 sts; k4tog (3 yo loops + st), k2.
  • Row 5: P4, *yo, sl 1 wyib as if to purl, p3; rep from * to last 5 sts; yo, sl 1 wyib as if to purl, p4.
  • Row 6: K4, *yo, sl yo + st wyib as if to purl, k3; rep from * to last 6 sts; yo, sl yo + st wyib as if to purl, k4.
  • Row 7: P4, *yo, sl 2 loops of yo + sl 1 wyib as if to purl, p3; rep from * to last 7 sts; yo, sl 2 loops of yo + sl 1 wyib as if to purl, p4.
  • Row 8: K4, *k4tog (3 yo loops + a st); rep from * to last 8 sts; k4tog (3 yo loops + st), k4.

Repeat Rows 1-8 for tuck stitch.

Tutorial

To see a bigger picture, open it in the new tab.

Row 1

Row 2

Row 3

Row 4

Tuck Stitch. Hand Knitting.

Knit 3.

You will repeat the same steps for Rows 5-8. The only difference is that you will knit 4 sts at the beginning of a row, instead of two – you shift the tuck stitch 2 stitches to the left.

Here is the result. Looks exactly like the machine knit tuck stitch!

Tuck Stitch. Hand Knitting.

Don’t be afraid to experiment – try “spreading out” the stitch, try different placement of stitches, try different fibers! I think knitting a garment with overall tuck stitch pattern will be very time consuming, but you can always add this stitch as a decorative element to your simple stockinette! One more way to speed up the process is to knit with a very loose gauge – this way you will create a lacy fabric perfect for spring and summer light pullovers/tops. Feel free to ask me any questions in the comments!

I hope you will use this stitch in some of your projects. Have a wonderful week!


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How to Knit a Perfect Edge – Finishing Free Technique

Today I would love to share with you a technique that I learned several years ago that is absolutely essential for cardigans if you want to avoid knitting the bands and finishing the raw edges. It also comes in handy for scarves or any items with open raw edges. It looks like an applied I-cord, but rather than picking up stitches along the edge and knitting the i-cord on, you knit “I-cord” simultaneously with the main fabric and don’t have to spend time to trim the edges after you are done with the project – a huge time saver!

How to Knit a Perfect Edge

This technique can be used with any stitch pattern. It looks best when knit next to the textured stitches, but can be used with simple stockinette, it won’t “pop” as much, but it will do the work – keep the edge of your knitting flat and neat – from the front, back and the sides. I used it a lot in my “pre-blog era”, but there are several projects with this technique documented here – Textured Scarf (I think it was my third or forth blog post!), Journey sweater (to create side splits) and Grateful Shawl (to create smooth edges and avoid finishing later).

There are two types of “i-cords” or selvage stitches I use – double and triple. They look slightly different from each other. Triple is thicker and will be perfect for cardigan front edges – it will perfectly hold the shape. Double is great for light garments and for lace. First I will give you the written instructions and then I’ll break it down for you in step-by-step photo tutorial.

Abbreviations

  • Sl – slip.
  • wyib – with yarn in back.
  • wyif – with yarn in front.
  • st/sts – stitch/stitches.
  • k – knit.
  • p – purl.

Double Selvage

Instructions:

Row 1 (RS): Sl 1 wyib, k1; work in any given stitch pattern to last 2 sts; sl 1 wyib, p1.

Row 2 (WS): Sl 1 wyib, p1; work in any given stitch pattern to last 2 sts; sl 1 wyif, p1.

Repeat Rows [1-2] for a double i-cord/selvage.

Tutorial

(To see a bigger picture, open it in the new tab)

Right Side Row

Wrong Side Row

Triple Selvage

Instructions:

Row 1 (RS): Sl 1 wyib, sl 1 wyif, k1; work in any given stitch pattern to last 3 sts; k1, sl 1 wyif, p1.

Row 2 (WS): Sl 1 wyib, k1, sl 1 wyif; work in any given stitch pattern to last 3 sts; sl 1 wyif, k1, p1.

Repeat Rows [1-2] for a triple selvage/i-cord.

Tutorial

(To see a bigger picture, open it in the new tab)

Right Side Row

Wrong Side Row

The result

The front of the work:

How to Knita Perfect Edge

The back of the work:

How to Knit a Perfect Edge

As you can see both sides are equally neat and even. One more thing to remember – if you are adding this edging to a scarf, for example, don’t forget to add 4 (for a double one) or 6 (for a triple one) extra stitches to your stitch count.

I hope you will find this tutorial useful for many of your future projects!


UPDATE

I gathered most commonly asked question in the comments and in the emails and tried to answer them in the best way possible – I created an additional blog post for it (How To Knit The Perfect Edge. Ribbing and Binding Off). I am copying my answers here, so you can have everything in one place.

  • What stitch pattern can I use the i-cord edge with?

Basically, you can use it with ANY stitch pattern. But I would say that the i-cord looks the best next to the textured stitch patterns.

When used next to the stockinette stitch, there are some things to keep in mind.

  • The icord won’t stand out as much against the stockinette as it does against the textured stitches.
  • If knit too tight, it might start pulling the stockinette fabric. Make sure to swatch before you use it on a bigger project. If you see that the i-cord is puling the fabric, you will have to watch your tension more carefully and make i-cord stitches longer than the ones in the main fabric.
  • The edge will stop the rolling of the fabric, but you might have to adjust the number of stitches in the i-cord. Thinner yarns will require more stitches to keep the edge in place, with thicker yarns 3-st i-cord selvage might be enough. The only thing to know for sure what works best for you is to make a swatch.

The i-cord would look and behave perfectly with garter stitch, brioche stitch or any slip stitch textured pattern.

  • How many extra stitches to add to the stitch count?

Though I mentioned it in the main tutorial post, I still got some questions, so I decided to cover this question in a more detailed way.

For 2-st I-cord selvage you will add 4 extra stitches to your stitch count. For 3-st I-cord selvage you will add 6 extra stitches to you stitch count.

So, if you have the pattern, let’s say, for the garter stitch scarf that tells you to cast on 60 sts and you want to add the 2-st i-cord selvage to it, you will cast on 64 sts and if you are adding 3-st i-cord selavage, you will cast on 66 sts.

  • How to add the i-cord selvage to the cardigan bands?

This question cannot be covered in one post. If you are an experienced knitter and can easily modify patterns, here are some tips that can help you:

  • You can use the i-cord selvage only when the bands are knit simultaneously with the body or if the bands are knit separately and then sewn on the body of the cardigan.
  • If the stitches for the pattern are being picked up and the band is knit perpendicular to the main body of the cardigan, then you should use the i-cord bind off technique.

If you are more confident with following the pattern, The Choice is the knit that uses the i-cord selvage technique when the band is knit simultaneously with the body of the cardigan.

  • Do you slip stitches knitwise or purlwise?

The stitches are supposed to be slipped always purlwise.

  • How to use the i-cord edge when changing colors?

This question cannot be covered in a couple of sentences, I will make sure to create a separate tutorial for it!

  • How to use the i-cord edge with the ribbing?

The i-cord edge is perfect for using with ribbing patterns! As a matter of fact, I have used it in all my patterns with the split ribbing edge. You can find it in different variations in Journey, Ivy, Mohair Flor and The Edge.

How To Knit The Perfect Edge. Ribbing.

You can check the tutorial for the selvage i-cord + ribbing here – How To Knit The Perfect Edge. Ribbing and Binding Off

  • How to bind off the i-cord edge?

Binding off the i-cord is not much different as binding off in pattern any other stitch. For a photo tutorial see this post – How To Knit The Perfect Edge. Ribbing and Binding Off


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By | 2018-04-08T08:47:10+00:00 April 17th, 2016|Free Patterns and Tutorials, Tutorial|134 Comments

How To Trim A Neckline In Sweaters – Perfect Neckline Trim Tutorial

Today I have a big tutorial for you. It is a very detailed step-by-step instruction how to finish the neckline in sweaters impeccably. Finishing is not the most fun part of the process, but this is the reality – good finishing can save a sweater hiding all the imperfections and bad finishing can ruin the most perfectly made sweater.

I learned this technique several years ago and I use it almost every single time for any kind of trim – neckline, cardigan bands, armholes. You can see it in my Gallery sweater, Mineral Heather sweater, La Flor sweater, Ocean and Violet Gift dresses. It saved many of my far from perfect bind off and side edges. What I also love about it is that you can use it as a decorative element too.

How To Trim Neckline In Knitting

So, let’s suppose you are done with knitting your sweater, seamed the shoulders and ready to trim it. Here is my mini “sweater”.

How To Trim Neckline In Knitting

As you can see the neckline is not perfectly smooth, though I used sloped bind off to avoid steps in the neckline. The place where you join new ball of yarn is visible. But I assure you all these imperfections will be hidden after the trim.

You will need the following:

  • Your sweater/dress/top with seamed shoulders.
  • The same yarn that you used for the main body.
  • The contrasting yarn – this is optional. You can use only one yarn, the one that you used for the main body. I am using contrasting yarn for the demonstration purposes and to show you how you can add a contrasting color element to your sweater using this technique.
  • Crochet hook in size recommended for the yarn you are using (check the label, usually this information is listed there).
  • Circular needle one-two sizes smaller than the one you used for the main body.

Don’t be afraid of the crochet hook. Even if you’ve never made a single stitch with the crochet hook, you can still use it successfully following this step by step photo guide.

Before we get to the actual trimming, let’s look at the places from where we are going to pick up the stitches. This is very crucial for a smooth neckline trim. There are three different places from where we will pick up stitches – the straight horizontal bind off edge, the straight vertical edge (the place where you were knitting straight without binding off stitches) and the sloped edge. Let’s see from where we are supposed to pick up stitches.

The straight vertical edge. The arrow shows the place from where we will pick up our stitches – right between the selvage stitch and the next stitch.

How To Trim Neckline In Knitting

The bind off edges (both straight and sloped). The arrow shows the stitch right UNDER the bind off. Some tutorials tell you to pick up stitches inserting needle/crochet hook under the bind off edge, but in my opinion it is not the perfect way, as it can create little holes. I always insert the needle/crochet hook IN the stitch that is right below the bind off edge (see the red arrow) and pick up a stitch from there.

How To Trim Neckline In Knitting

Now we are ready to start. If you want to see a bigger picture, open it in the new tab.

Take a crochet hook and yarn in contrasting or the same color.

Here how it will look like when you are done with this section.

How To Trim Neckline In Knitting

In the next section you will work along the straight bind off edge and then get to the other side of the neckline and again work along the straight section.

We are done with the front and will do the same thing on the back.

Now we need to “close” the slip stitch chain.

We are done with the most challenging part of the process. Now everything is going to be very easy.

Now you will continue working as usual – in the stitch that your pattern instructions indicate. There is one more step that I do before getting to the recommended stitch pattern for the band. You can also do it if you want to add a little bit more texture to the band, but it is entirely up to you. After I picked up all the stitches, I purl the first row and only then start the recommended stitch pattern.

Here how the band looks like from the back.

How To Trim Neckline In Knitting

And here is the front.

How To Trim Neckline In Knitting

You can compare it with “before” picture and see how all imperfections are hidden. There are no holes, no bulk in the neckline area and there is a beautiful contrasting chain running smoothly along the edge.

I hope you will use this technique in your projects. Please, let me know if you still have any questions, I’ll be happy to answer them in the comments.


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By | 2017-08-01T08:01:14+00:00 March 14th, 2016|Free Patterns and Tutorials, Tutorial|53 Comments

Chunky Seed Stitch Cowl. No-Pattern Pattern.

Happy Sunday!

FO – Chunky Seed Stitch Cowl

seed-stitch-cowl-pattern-13-2-16-4

My Chunky Seed Stitch Cowl literally flew off the needles! It turned out exactly how I envisioned it – big, cozy and warm. I really love its color, which is very versatile and casual. It was a great quick and relaxing project to take here and there when I had a couple of free minutes or just before going to sleep. It’s also great for car knitting – you don’t have to keep track of any numbers and can literally knit it with close eyes.

Project Notes

Pattern. I wrote quick pattern notes at the end. If you have some similar leftover yarn in your stash, you can use it. This project is perfect for beginners!

Yarn. DK weight merino/silk blend, two strands held together + light grey baby alpaca. You can read more about yarn here – Chunky Seed Stitch Cowl. I used my favorite ADDI circular needles (5 mm) – it is always such a joy to work with them!
Free Seed Stitch Cowl Pattern

Size. I made a pretty big cowl – 58″ (147 cm) in circumference and 12.5″ (32 cm) wide. It can be easily double wrapped around the neck for extreme coziness! The yarn is perfect to wear next to your skin – warm, not scratchy at all and very soft.

Free Seed Stitch Cowl Pattern

Texture. I am really happy that I made two swatches to compare. My first intention was to use moss stitch, but looking at the texture of the seed stitch and how great it goes with the gradient, I realize I made the right call 🙂 Never skip swatching – it is so worth it!  Gradient effect is my favorite part, it looks like the cowl is covered in snow.

Free Seed Stitch Cowl Pattern

Here are some pattern notes that you can use to make your own cozy seed stitch cowl. I call it no-pattern pattern – basically you can get any type of yarn, any needles, knit 20 stitch swatch and do your own numbers. These notes just give you the idea of the project and point where you can do your own modifications.

Chunky Seed Stitch Cowl Pattern

SIZE:

One size.

FINISHED MEASUREMENTS:

Finished circumference: 58″ (147 cm)

Finished height: 12 1/2″ (32 cm) (The solid color part – 10″, the gradient part – 2 1/2″)

Note: If you don’t want to make the double wrap cowl, you can easily make it with 25-30″ circumference.

MATERIALS:

Yarn. Any DK weight yarn holding two strands together. I used approximately 6 skeins of Knit Picks Gloss DK weight yarn (123 yds or 112 m/50 g; 70% Merino Wool, 30% Silk) colourway Hawk + 1 skein of 100% baby alpaca.

Note:  I used two strands because at the end I was mixing two different types of yarn. So, at first I was knitting with two strands of merino/silk, then I left just one strand and added one strand of baby alpaca to it to create slight gradient effect. If you plan to make it in one color, just use thicker yarn. Two strands of DK weight yarn approximately equal to one strand of aran/bulky yarn.

Needles. 5 mm (US 8) circular 80 cm (31″).

GAUGE

4″ (10 cm) = 11 sts. The round gauge is not essential in this project, you just keep knitting until you are happy with the cowl’s height.

Note: Feel free to play around with numbers. Your gauge shouldn’t be exactly the same. The best way to check if you are happy with your yarn/needle size combination is the swatch.

STITCH EXPLANATION

Seed Stitch in the Round:

Rnd 1: *K1, p1; rep from * to end.

Rnd 2: * P1, k1; rep from * to end.

Repeat Rnds 1-2 for Seed Stitch pattern.

INSTRUCTIONS

Holding two strands together of yarn A and using long tail cast on method, cast on 161 sts + 1 extra st for the invisible join.

Helpful Tip: If I cast on with one needle, I find it too tight, so I almost always hold two needles together when casting on and when I am done I take one needle out and start knitting as usual. This way the cast on stitches are not tight and the first row/round is very easy to knit. It is not always convenient with the circular needle, especially if you have a big number of stitches to cast on, because after you are done with cast on and need to take one needle out, the cord often doesn’t let you do that. You can do the following:

  1. Take one end of the circular needle and take the straight needle of the same or of very close size.
  2. Put them together and start the usual long tail cast on. You will cast on stitches on two needles held together – one end of circular needle and the straight needle.
  3. When you cast on all the stitches, just pull the straight needle out. You are left with nice, not too tight cast on stitches on the circular needle.

Note: If you choose to change the stitch count for your cowl, keep the following in mind. When knitting seed stitch in the round it is better to cast on an odd number of stitches. 1 extra stitch is cast on for the invisible join in the round. 

Making sure not to twist stitches, join the knitting to work in the round using the invisible join – How To Knit The Invisible Join In The Round. – 161 sts left. Place BOR marker.

Work even in seed stitch pattern until piece reaches the desired solid color height (in my case – 10″ (25 cm)). Remove one strand of yarn A and join one strand of yarn B. Work even in seed stitch holding one strand of yarn A and one strand of yarn B together until the desired height of the cowl.

Bind off.

Weave in ends. Block to measurements.

Wrap yourself in your very own chunky and cozy cowl!

Free Seed Stitch Cowl Pattern

I hope you will find this mini-pattern useful someday!

Have a great Sunday!


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