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Fog Cardigan. Details.

Cardigan knitting pattern

Textured, grey, slightly oversized, woolly – this knitwear formula will never cease to inspire me. Fog cardigan has finally taken its shape both on the needle and on paper. I spent a lot of time redesigning my pattern layout, and I am so happy how it turned out – very minimalistic, clean and detailed. I wanted to look for the graphic designer to do that, but I am such a control freak and it is so hard for me to delegate, this is my biggest problem. I will hire a graphic designer one day, but this time I enjoyed the whole process so much and I am so happy with the result, that it was worth all the time spent. The pattern is already in hands of my amazing test knitters and I am so excited to watch their progress. I will make sure to share it with you here!

I am pleased to show with you the preview of the sweater, I loved taking photos of its lines, details and texture contrasts. Hope you will like it too and I will see it on your needles this Fall.

Cardigan knitting pattern

Cardigan knitting pattern

Cardigan knitting pattern

Have a wonderful day today!


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By |2019-08-14T06:14:46-07:00July 24th, 2019|Finished Objects|6 Comments

Grey Edge Sweater

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift of Knitting.

Happy Birthday, The Gift Of Knitting! 4 years ago, on 16th of August I published my first post here and I am so happy I did! I probably will never express well enough how much this place means to me and how much I love being here. It pushes me in so many ways and makes me grow in many aspects of my life. Thank you for being here and for following this knit journal, it means a lot to me!

And now back to knitting. 3D cable Grey Edge, neutral lighter interpretation of my original The Edge, is my new wardrobe staple. I am visiting my family right now, and the weather is so unpredictable here – real summer days change to gloomy rainy afternoons that feel like Fall. The sweater is perfect to throw on – it is warm, but very light and goes with everything.

For this photo story me and my friend found a beautiful spot – just 15 minutes away from the city, there is a beautiful forest that looked like the perfect location for the sweater.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift of Knitting.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift of Knitting.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift of Knitting.

I am not linking the yarn, because it was discontinued long time ago, it had been in my stash for more than three years before it found its life in this sweater. It is a worsted weight alpaca/Peruvian wool blend.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift of Knitting.

As the yarn is lighter than the original, I was knitting XL size to get the intended ease. One modification I did was to shorten the length, it is not cropped, but this version sits higher on the hips – the pattern indicates where you can make this adjustment.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift of Knitting.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift of Knitting.

 

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift of Knitting.

Compared to the original version, Grey Edge has less structure and more drape and movement to it – this is what alpaca does. If you want to add extra softness and flow to your knits, choose yarns with alpaca in its content. But also remember that it will pill more over the time. But so far, after quiet a few uses I don’t notice any pilling, I think Peruvian wool balances alpaca in this blend perfectly.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift of Knitting.

 

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift of Knitting.

The favorite thing about this project is 3D cables, they were one of the reasons why I came back to it. So addicting! It is this feeling when you catch “just one more row” knitting fever and can’t put down the project.

I hope you enjoyed this post! Thank you for being here!

Here is to hopefully many more years for The Gift Of Knitting!


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By |2018-08-17T11:06:09-07:00August 16th, 2018|Finished Objects, Knitting|5 Comments

Rain Sweater. WAK Pima Cotton. FO Details

We Are Knitters Textured Sweater

Happy Sunday! I hope you are having a wonderful weekend! If you remember this summer I published one more visual yarn story with Pima cotton yarn by We Are Knitters. At that time I was so busy with my day job, life in general and finishing the patterns for Vintage collection that I was craving for some unplanned, unpredictable and easy going knit. I “blindly” cast on and dived into this experiment on-the-go.A couple of months later this sweater came off my needles.

We Are Knitters Textured Sweater

Project Details

[box size=”large” style=”rounded”]Pattern[/box]

Not that much planning was involved in this sweater. The only thing I knew for sure was that I wanted to use elongated slip stitches – I just loved the smooth stockinette stitch fabric created by Pima cotton yarn and I felt like the slip stitches will create these “drops” of texture that will stand out, but not interrupt the simple background stitch. And as I was a couple of rounds in the neckline, I had another idea – what if to turn the dropped stitches into travelling across the sweater pattern. As soon as I tried it, I loved it and the rest is history 🙂

The name for the sweater – Rain – came in the middle of the project. In my eyes the diagonal lines of the elongated dropped stitches looked like drops of rain running along the window on a gloomy day.

 

We Are Knitters Textured Sweater

[box size=”large” style=”rounded”]Yarn[/box]

Pima cotton by We Are Knitters. When WAK asked me to review one of their summer yarns, I knew pima cotton will be the perfect choice! This definitely my favorite type of cotton to work with – it;s amazing how soft and smooth it is and what beautiful fabric it creates – light, with crisp stitch definition and great drape! The other thing I wanted to point out is that the yardage for this yarn balls is so so so generous – I used just 3 (!!!) skeins for the whole sweater! I definitely have more that enough left for at least one more project!

We Are Knitters Textured Sweater

[box size=”large” style=”rounded”]Design Details [/box]

As this sweater was planned as a zen knitting project, I kept things very simple.

We Are Knitters Textured Sweater

Minimal neckline shaping that looks something between round neck or boat neckline, top down raglan construction with longer armholes for a relaxed fit, minimal shaping in the body and classic i-cord finishing.

We Are Knitters Textured Sweater

My favorite detail of this sweater is sleeves – the elongated travelling drop stitch pattern used for the central panel in the main body mirrored in on the sleeves, running from the elbow all the way down to the cuff. I think it not only creates an interesting design detail, but also makes it so much more fun to knit the sleeves – you will be addicted to see how the “rain drops” are being painted by your needles.

We Are Knitters Textured Sweater

We Are Knitters Textured Sweater

Thank you, We Are Knitters, for this fun collaboration! I really hope I’ve managed to show the beauty of this fiber in this sweater.

We Are Knitters Textured Sweater

[box size=”large” style=”rounded”]Test Knitting[/box]

If you like the sweater, please, let me know if you’d like to see it turned into the pattern and if you are interested in test knitting it. I will use my notes that I’ve made along the way and will finish the first draft of the pattern for Monday, October 2nd. Test knitting basically involves knitting the piece, sending me your notes/suggestions along the way and taking photos of the progress and the final piece and creating the Ravelry project page with all the notes and photos. You can also post about it on your Instagram account and the blog, if you have one. The deadline for finishing the sweater (including your photos of the finished piece and your notes) will be for Monday, November 13th (6 weeks from October 2nd). If you think, you can make it, please, send me an email at alina@giftofknitting.com or Ravelry message. Thank you so much!

We Are Knitters Textured Sweater

Have a wonderful Sunday!


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By |2017-09-24T06:58:20-07:00September 24th, 2017|Finished Objects, Knitting, Pattern|9 Comments

The Gift Of Knitting – California Crop WATG Top

Knit Crop Top. Free Knitting Pattern

Happy Sunday! This weekend I finally had a chance to take photos of my California crop top I made with ribbon cotton yarn Stone Washed by Wool and the Gang. Summer crop top was on my must-knit list for ages, but for some reason I kept postponing it, maybe because my stash yarn didn’t sparkle the imagination – nothing felt as the perfect match for this kind of project. But when you find the right yarn, you have to go for it!

Ribbon yarn creates a very interesting fabric that has some structure to it, without losing its drape. It worked perfectly for the loose cropped shape of the top – it keeps its form, without being too stiff.

Knit Crop Top. Free Knitting Pattern

I improvised the pattern, but kept my notes. I will post the instructions for it and all the FO details next week, so if you feel like it, you can repeat it for yourself or your dear ones. It is a very quick and relaxing project to work on, I’m sure you will like it! I used only three skeins of Stone Washed for it. This is a great project to take with you on your summer vacation – you don’t need to pack lots of yarn, the process is pretty simple and straightforward and as it’s short and sleeveless, you’ll be able to finish it in several afternoons.

Knit Crop Top. Free Knitting Pattern

California crop top is for hot summer days; for unplanned road trips with dear friends; for signing along Pink Floyd way too loud in the car; for messy hair and sun burned skin…

Knit Crop Top. Free Knitting Pattern

Have a wonderful Sunday with your dear ones!


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By |2017-07-23T08:35:40-07:00July 23rd, 2017|Finished Objects, Knitting|13 Comments

Pom Pom Socklets. FO Details.

Pom Pom Socklets

FO – Pom Pom

Well, I guess I am a sock knitter now 🙂 Finished my first pair and though they aren’t perfectly perfect, I love these socks – super soft, playful, made of cotton, ideal for summer. Thank you, my fellow knitters, for converting me :).

Project Details

[box style=”rounded”]Pattern[/box]

Pom Pom Socklets by Purl Soho is one of the cutest socks patterns I have ever seen. Perfect for beginners with very clear instructions and photos for the visual help. Though it was my first sock project, I didn’t have any trouble following the instructions once. Definitely recommend it!

Pom Pom Socklets

[box style=”rounded”]Yarn[/box]

SilverSpun by Feel Good Yarn Company from December KnitCrate surprise box is a blend of combed cotton, nylon, spandex and silver. It is very soft, sleek and stretchy – I loved working every single stitch with it. The only thing that I wasn’t happy about is how the red color left spots on the white background – you can see a few smudges. I am always careful when washing the pieces made in more than one color, because you never know how it will behave. Though I put the socks in the cold water and left them for literally 30 seconds, red still washed slightly out and left the spots.

Pom Pom Socklets

[box style=”rounded”]Modifications[/box]

The initial idea was to knit the socks in silver color and add the contrasting pom pom. But, as I mentioned in my WIP post, I decided to rip out the sock when I noticed that there might be not enough silver yarn. I read through the pattern a couple of times, carefully looked through the photos to get the idea of the construction, because you can’t really make modifications to the pattern if you have no idea about the logic behind it; it seemed pretty straightforward so I just switched to the red color as soon as I started the heel. As I reached the toe, I put one sock aside and started the second one and knit it to the same spot to find out if I have enough yarn for both toes. I didn’t, so I switched to red color again for the toe. That’s a great way to save you from all the consequences of yarn chicken game and trouble of ripping out.

Another modification I’ve made is the number of stitches picked for the gusset. Just like I mentioned in my Raglan Armhole tutorial, sometimes the recommended amount of stitches isn’t enough to close all the holes. I picked 2 extra stitches on each corner and decreased them on the very next round coming to the recommended number, but avoiding all the trouble of closing the holes.

Pom Pom Socklets

[box style=”rounded”]Design Details[/box]

The main detail that attracted me to this pattern is the pom pom. Super adorable and playful. I’ve made them with the simple fork, but I am definitely putting the real pom pom maker on my must buy list. I loved the Pom Pom Maker review by Julie from Knitted Bliss and I know that I need it in my life 🙂

Pom Pom Socklets

[box style=”rounded”]Helpful Notes[/box]

So, to sum everything up, here are some notes that you might find helpful:

[unordered_list style=”tick”]

  • If you are an absolute beginner and have no idea how to manage double pointed needles, especially if the set-up rounds seem way too tricky to you, check this tutorial Casting On With Double Pointed Needles. It’s definitely worth to try and learn a new skill.
  • Be careful with knitting two colored socks, make sure to check how the colors work on the swatch to avoid any disappointments later.
  • If you don’t have a pom pom maker, check this very helpful video tutorial how to make pom poms using just a regular fork! It took me a couple of attempts, but at the end they turned out fine. Just make sure to use very sharp scissors!

[/unordered_list]

Have a wonderful weekend!

I have to work tomorrow, but it promises to be something exciting, so I am actually looking forward to it!


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By |2017-04-07T06:53:19-07:00April 7th, 2017|Finished Objects, Knitting|7 Comments

YOTH Cardigan

Textured Cardigan

This week one more cardigan flew off my needles – the project for YOTH yarns that I started this Fall is over and I am a little bit sad to let it go… It was a pure joy to work with Father in Hazelnut, this yarn has such an amazing stitch definition and it knits like butter!

YOTH cardigan is a top down cardigan with the yoke shaped as a compound raglan to ensure the perfect fit. It’s “framed” with a classic 1×1 rib neckband with a collar shaped with the help of short rows. The border is finished with an i-cord bind off.

Textured Cardigan

It has a very “clean” and refined look, just like YOTH yarns company whose aesthetics I tried to reflect in this knitwear piece. And, of course, I couldn’t not add some texture to it. I played around with the stitch that has been one my “to-knit” list forever, changed it a little bit and was very happy with the result. It reminds me, for some reason, of the palm leaf…

Textured Cardigan

I also love the wrong side of the cardigan – it has a completely different look, but also creates a very interesting texture effect! What I am also really pleased with is that this stitch is very stretchy, which will ensure that the body of the cardigan fits you perfectly even if your gauge was a little bit off.

Textured Cardigan

Father is very quick to knit with! I would definitely recommend it to beginners as it’s very easy to create neat and crisp stitches in this yarn.

Textured Cardigan

One more little detail that I love so much is a slightly curved edges of the border that create beautiful smooth lines.

Textured Cardigan

Textured Cardigan

The cardigan will fly to YOTH yarns soon, and though I am a little bit sad to let it go, I am really excited to see how YOTH team will style it – so looking forward to their photoshoot! I am sure they will do a great job, I really love how they present their yarns and knitwear. The pattern will be available through YOTH Ravelry store in winter 2017. You can follow YOTH yarns on Instagram @yarnonthehouse to keep up with all the updates.

Textured Cardigan

I hope you are having a wonderful week!

See you at Yarn Along!


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By |2017-04-07T07:00:04-07:00December 21st, 2016|Finished Objects, Knitting, Pattern|33 Comments
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