Alina

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So far Alina has created 411 blog entries.

Portrait of Yarn and The City

YOTH Yarns. The Gift Of Knitting.

Happy Sunday! Past week I’ve got two packages that made my heart sing. First is a beautiful rambouillet & merino blend by YOTH yarnsDaughter. I worked with 100% rambouillet and 100% merino before, but never had a chance to try them in a blend. Daughter has a nice spring to it, creates great stitch definition and drape; and this neutral color – Natural Vanilla – got my heart, I see some textured sweater coming – just so inspiring!

YOTH Yarns. The Gift Of Knitting.

Along with delicious yarn, I was lucky enough to receive the most wonderful gift from my boss – a coffee table book New York. Portrait of a City. This is an absolute treasure, it is not just a book with pretty photos, but the actual story of the city with rare images from “over 150 celebrated photographers from the mid-19th century to the present day”.

YOTH Yarns. The Gift Of Knitting.

This book captures the feeling of the streets, the sidewalks, the chaos, the energy, the ethnic diversity, the culture, the fashion, the architecture, the anger, and the complexity of the mythical, mystical Big Apple.

 

YOTH Yarns. The Gift Of Knitting.

As for Daughter, it is coming with me to Russia!! I am so excited to bring it on my trip, get inspired by my home country and, of course, share it with my Grandma and say to her once again – Thank you from the bottom of my heart for taking me to this tiny yarn store 9 years ago, it made such a huge difference in my life. 

YOTH Yarns. The Gift Of Knitting.

I hope you are going to have a wonderful day today!

 

YOTH Yarns. The Gift Of Knitting.


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By | 2018-07-08T07:24:15+00:00 July 8th, 2018|Knitting, Yarn|3 Comments

The Gift Of Knitting. Alpaca Wheat.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift Of Knitting.

A couple of weeks ago I had a chance to take some photos of this mix of Heritage and Wheat patterns with my dear friend. She is always up for photography experiments and I cannot get enough of the knitwear images. And when you find the perfect textured wall that makes the perfect contrast for the sweater, then the rest is easy. I hope you are going to enjoy this knitwear photostory.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift Of Knitting.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift Of Knitting.

I am so glad I finally have the sweater in this perfect green shade that is deep, vibrant, but not too bright. It is a great staple wardrobe piece that I know I am going to wear a lot. Baby alpaca is so cozy that it feels like I am wearing a cloud around my body.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift Of Knitting.

Love this marriage of Heritage and Wheat patterns so much, both of them were a joy to work on and to have them combined in one piece makes this project really special to me. The sweater is pretty fitting in the sleeves to stretch the cable section so the texture really pops out and the body is loose, casual and has a nice drape to it.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift Of Knitting.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift Of Knitting.

I love how this very easy beginner friendly cable crosses create such a mesmerizing visual effect!

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift Of Knitting.

Have a wonderful Sunday today!


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By | 2018-07-01T07:35:53+00:00 July 1st, 2018|Knitting|8 Comments

Change of Perspective

Knitting Blog

Sometimes to move on in life or knitting you need a change of perspective. I’ve made a rule for myself long time ago – when it gets overwhelming, just get busy, look around you and try to see things from a different point of view. In knitting changing things fuels creativity and the flow of new ideas for me. I love switching between fibers and textures, this diversity inspires me so much and I am grateful that we, knitters, are so lucky these days to enjoy this abundance of choice when it comes to yarn.

Knitting Blog

After finishing Wings sweater (will share it with you in July!!) in gorgeous blend of plant fibers in sport weight yarn, I was craving for something woolly and chunky. My Crazy Sexy Wool skeins fit perfectly. If you remember, several months ago I was planning to make a crochet cowl with it, but somehow I kept postponing it and a week ago I was struck with another idea that is still in swatching stage, but I think it might be “it”! I can’t describe how much I love this feeling when you finally “know” what this skein of yarn should become. Sometimes it takes me months to catch this feeling, but I decided never make something just for the sake of making, but wait for that perfect match of the yarn and idea.

Knitting Blog

I am sure that this idea was sparkled by Daisy yarn, so delicate and drapey that my next project HAD to be something chunky and super cozy for new Fall knitting season. My hands love this contrast of fibers, it is a great tactile experience to switch between such different yarns!

Knitting Blog

Have a beautiful day today!


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By | 2018-06-27T08:13:35+00:00 June 27th, 2018|Knitting, Yarn|3 Comments

Grey Edge

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift Of Knitting.

Happy Sunday! My trip is just one month away and though I have three more projects planned, I was crazy enough to cast on The Edge. It is really interesting how my knitter’s brain works – as soon as I finish a design, I already have ideas what forms and colors it could take. It happened with almost all of my patterns, it is like I cannot get enough of them the first time around and crave to come back to play a little bit more with the design and sometimes this results in additional pattern files I add to the original version:

Reindeer was knit in merino/silk and then recreated in cotton, because I was craving to see the stitch definition the cotton creates.

La Flor took a completely different shape when knit in gorgeous mohair, which resulted in additional pattern file.

The Choice also gives you two options to choose (pun intended 🙂 ) from – cable or simple textured back.

Heritage and Wheat sweaters found their new life in the pattern “cocktail” when both sweaters merged in one.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift Of Knitting.

And now The Edge. I love my dusty pink aran weight sweater that I was wearing all winter, but when planning my trip home, I knew I needed some neutral cozy loose sweater that I’ll throw on with my black joggers and get on this 30+ hour journey. Well, The Edge fit perfectly – I was so craving to come back to these 3D cables that I love knitting so much!

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift Of Knitting.

So, of course, I am adding some mods to it, seems like I can never knit something as it is without modifications. The sweater will be lighter, as the yarn is thinner compared to the original one and I am thinking of making it crop length… Well, hopefully it will be ready just in time and keep me cozy during the flight, because I always get so cold in the planes.

Textured Cable Sweater Knitting Pattern. The Gift Of Knitting.

Hope you have some nice projects to work on this Sunday!


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By | 2018-06-24T07:54:18+00:00 June 24th, 2018|Knitting|6 Comments

How to Incorporate Increased Stitches into the Established Pattern

How to Incorporate Increased Stitches into Established Pattern

In my latest pattern that is being tested right now, you will find the instructions that look something like that “work even, incorporating the increased sts into est pattern”. Though I try to write my patterns as detailed as possible and in this particular pattern I walk the knitter through the first rows/rounds with step by step instructions on how to work the increased stitches into the pattern, it is impossible to write up every single row of the sweater, just because it would end up way too big and messy. So, such instructions as “work as est” come in handy and they are pretty self explanatory.

But what if you are a new knitter and this whole concept of “as established” is scary for you? In this tutorial I will try to explain to you the basics of how to increase stitches and keep the pattern sequence intact.

Before I begin here is the list of abbreviations used:

M1R – make one right increase.

M1L – make one left increase.

inc/inc-s/inc-d – increase/increases/increased

st/sts – stitch/stitches

How to Incorporate Increased Stitches into the Established Pattern

1×1 rib

To enlarge the photo, click on it.

As you can see, incorporating increased stitches into binary stitch patterns (2 st repeat patterns) is very easy – all you have to do is to look at one stitch before or after it for the clue what you are supposed to work to keep the pattern intact.

But what if there are more stitches in one repeat, especially this is the case for lace shawls. I remember knitting my first lace shawl from Vogue Knitting issue and was quiet lost at first when the pattern asked to incorporate the increased stitches into a complicated lace pattern. When this happens and you don’t have a chance to write to designer to ask for help, the best way to go is to understand the stitch pattern sequence and the logic behind it.

For demonstrations, let’s take Double Moss stitch pattern that has 4 st repeat + 2 sts for symmetry and 4 rows repeat:

Row 1 (RS): * K2, P2 *, K2

Row 2 (WS): P2, * K2, P2 *

Row 3: * P2, K2 *, P2

Row 4: K2, * P2, K2 *

How to Incorporate Increased Stitches into Established Pattern

This pattern is more tricky not only because it has more stitches in one repeat, but also because it has more rows in one full pattern repeat. Let’s tale a look on how you can handle it.

How to Incorporate Increased Stitches into the Established Pattern

Double Moss

To enlarge the photo, click on it.

After some practice, you will start “feeling” the stitch pattern and understand the logic of it much better, so the whole process of incorporating increased stitches would be quiet automatic and you won’t have to analyze it that much. This is the beauty of knitting – with some time and patience, you can easily master any aspect of it!

I hope you will find this tutorial helpful in your future projects.


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By | 2018-06-20T07:36:15+00:00 June 20th, 2018|Free Patterns and Tutorials|5 Comments

Alpaca Wheat Sweater. Pattern Cocktail

Textured Sweater Knitting Pattern. Gift Of Knitting.

Vintage collection that I created almost a year ago for Moeke yarns will always be special to me. It is a combination of what I love in knitwear – nice drape, clean lines, textures and a mix of basic stitch patterns to create a unique fabric. As you might remember from my Wheat Photo Album post, I have gifted the original version to my dear friend, but after I received a gorgeous baby alpaca from my friend, I knew I wanted to recreate one version for myself to wear, because I love those cables so much! Plus I was in need of a knitting project where I don’t have to take notes every step of the way. So I started in Fall, knitting a couple of rounds here and there, and just like that, slowly but steadily, the sweater is off the needles almost 9 months later!

Instead of repeating the pattern as it is, I decided to play a little bit and make a pattern cocktail. Ingredients: baby alpaca by Magliamania, Wheat and Heritage sweater patterns.

– Shaping
– Raglan lines

– Elongated back
– Slip stitch center line

– Cables
– I-cord bind off at the hem

 

This baby alpaca is slightly thicker than the merino by Moeke, so I followed the instructions for size XS, instead of my usual S. It turned out just right – following my shoulder lines, but nice an loose in the body. Alpaca has such a nice drape and the fabric created is so soft, it is such a tactile pleasure to have it right next to bare skin. The whole experiment went pretty smoothly, I only had to rip once when I realized that the i-cord bind off is way too tight and pulling on the fabric. I  went up one needle size and redid it. Now it has the perfect flow around my hips.

Textured Sweater Knitting Pattern. Gift Of Knitting.

Here you can see that the raglan line shaping is done, following the instructions for Wheat, but the slip stitch raglan lines are from Heritage.

Textured Sweater Knitting Pattern. Gift Of Knitting.

Heritage and Alpaca Wheat

Wheat pattern, like all of my top down raglans, has a step-by-step yoke instructions, written individually for each size and to help you keep track of the cabling, it has a note after each yoke round what cable round you are supposed to work. Though I must admit writing this part of the pattern is pretty time consuming, in actual knitting it makes the whole process so much easier, especially if you are working on the project the way I did on this one – couple of inches in several days. So when you come back to your knitting, you have all the information that you need, without trying to figure out what cable round you are supposed to work on.

Textured Sweater Knitting Pattern. Gift Of Knitting.

 

I love knitting sleeves, when they have some cabling – even better. I just love those basic stitch crosses that create such a beautiful texture.

Textured Sweater Knitting Pattern. Gift Of Knitting.

Original Wheat and Alpaca Wheat

I hope you will experiment some day and mix design features of several projects in one. It is always nice to see different variations of one pattern!

Have a wonderful Sunday!


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By | 2018-06-17T15:14:04+00:00 June 17th, 2018|Finished Projects, Knitting|5 Comments
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